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Indication

Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa) is indicated for the treatment of anemia... read more

Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa) is indicated for the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease (CKD), including patients on dialysis and patients not on dialysis. read more

Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa) is indicated for the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease (CKD), including patients on dialysis and patients not on dialysis.

Limitations of Use

  • Aranesp® has not been shown to improve quality of life, fatigue, or patient well-being.
  • Aranesp® is not indicated for use as a substitute for red blood cell transfusions in patients who require immediate correction of anemia.
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Aranesp® has the same mechanism of action as natural erythropoietin1

Aranesp® stimulates erythropoiesis and iron supports proper heme formation2-6

Hypothetical model of the response to Aranesp®1,7,8



Important Safety Information

  • Aranesp® is contraindicated in patients with:
    • Uncontrolled hypertension
    • Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) that begins after treatment with Aranesp® or other erythropoietin protein drugs
    • Serious allergic reactions to Aranesp®
  • Use caution in patients with coexistent cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Scroll down for additional
Important Safety Information.

Abbreviations and References:
QW = once weekly; Q2W = once every 2 weeks; Hb = hemoglobin.
References: 1. Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa) prescribing information, Amgen. 2. Guyton AC, Hall JE. Red blood cells, anemia, and polycythemia. In: Textbook of Medical Physiology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders; 2006:419-428. 3. Dessypris EN. Erythropoiesis. In: Lee GR, Foerster J, Lukens J, Wintrobe MM, eds. Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology. Vol. 1. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1998:169-192. 4. Papayannopoulou T, D’Andrea AD, Abkowitz JL, Migliaccio AR. Biology of erythropoiesis, erythroid differentiation, and maturation. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Shattil SJ, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2005:267-288. 5. Bunn H. Pathophysiology of the anemias. In: Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Braunwald E, eds. Harrison’s Principles and Practice of Internal Medicine. 13th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 1994:1717-1721. 6. Hillman RS, Finch CA. General characteristics of the erythron. In: Red Cell Manual. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company; 1996:1-15. 7. Sargent JA, Acchiardo SR. Iron requirements in hemodialysis. Blood Purif. 2004;22(1):112-123. 8. Uehlinger DE, Gotch FA, Sheiner LB. A pharmacodynamic model of erythropoietin therapy for uremic anemia. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1992;51(1):76-89. 9. Elliott S, Lorenzini T, Asher S, et al. Enhancement of therapeutic protein in vivo activities through glycoengineering. Nat Biotechnol. 2003;21(4):414-421.